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I’ve been holding out for a better selection of girly SKC shirts, or possibly the girl’s replica jersey. But it seemed wrong to go to the home opener in a plain blue shirt, so I decided to make my own shirt. I’m pretty pleased with how it turned out. I’m not sure how it’ll hold up in the wash, but it’ll serve me well for this one game at least.

Sporting Shirt

I came up with the design idea from a wallpaper someone posted on the forum at BigSoccer.com. I loved the idea of moving the “State Line” stripes out of the shield, and using that as the main focus of the shirt.

Sporting KC Wallpaper

Then I used a modified version of the Sporting Club shield.

Sporting Club Shield

And the arched version of “Sporting” for the back.

Sporting Font

My method was pretty simple… I printed out pieces of the design on paper. Cut them out. Traced them on the shirt in washable marker. My first tracing was kind of messy, so I went over the parts I wanted to keep with permanent marker, and threw it in the wash to remove the messy washable marker lines.

Line Drawing on Shirt

Then I painted the shirt with flat fabric paint and fabric markers. Since the paint is supposed to set for 72 hours before being washed, I didn’t have time for a test-wash. If it survives being washed, I may add “11” to the back of the shirt, in honor of SKC’s first season at LiveStrong Park.

Painted Shirt

I was tempted to use “Wizards” instead of “Sporting” on the back, but couldn’t find a version of the text I liked in a big enough image size. That’s probably for the best. For this season, at least, maybe it’s better to support the official name, and let “Wizards” ease into the territory of nickname, rather than stubbornly clinging or trying to force the issue.

And anyway, I’ve got my Wizards fan scarf🙂.

Wizards Scarf

Speaking of scarves, I finished my bar scarf in the new Sporting colors.

Sporting Bar Scarf

It’s basically my standard double-crochet scarf. This time, I tried something a little different, using a single-crochet for the first row of each color change. It makes tying down the ends of the two yarns a little easier and neater, and doesn’t look weird, so I’ll probably continue to use the pattern for bar scarves in the future.